RetroPie

I've always enjoyed retro gaming. In Fatdog we have always had dosbox (emulator for DOS games) for as long as I can remember, and scummvm (for Sierra games) came a little bit later. I've recently added a few more emulators: mednafen (multi-emulators for GBA, SNES and others), desmume (NDS), duckstation and pcsxr (PS1) as well as pcsx2 (PS2). I threw ZX-Tune as well, to play the music from those old games.

But very recently I've been introduced to RetroPie, a distro for Raspberry Pi (raspi) which is dedicated to turning your raspi to a retro gaming machine. Since I have a dusty Pi3 laying around doing nothing (which I was supposed to use for testing Mick's Raspbian Buster but never got my lazy bum off to actually do it - sorry Mick!), I reckon, why not give it a try. If it doesn't work all I wasted is a couple of minutes downloading ~800MB image and couple of minutes "dd"-ing it.

As it turned out, it worked the first time around. Once the SD card as prepared, I put it inside the raspi, hooked the raspi to my TV, and then turned the raspi on. I was instantly asked to configure my controller (I didn't have one, but no problem, retropie accepts keyboard too). I configured the optional wifi setup (I didn't have to do it, but I wanted to try its samba feature). Then all I needed to do was to install the games (which I can install via USB, SFTP, or Samba). No stupid questions, no hassle, no config file. It's all ready to use. Most of the popular emulators were already included, and those that don't, are literally available for installation, a few clicks away.

With retropie on it, the raspi has been magically turned into a retro gaming machine. In the beginning I didn't believe that the raspi had enough muster to pull up a decent emulation, but I was pleasantly proven wrong. Most emulators worked well. Some had a few stutters every once a while but it was nothing to fret about.

The display quality was good, too. Retro games were notorious for displaying low-res pixelated images on today's high-res TV, but the emulators included in retropi had a few tricks up their sleeve to make the images sharper. I'm not surprised about that (after all I compiled some of those for Fatdog64 too) but what surprised me that the little raspi could pull off the enhanced graphics too. Well again not all emulators and not all games, but as I said, nothing to fret about.

Now, I have FatdogArm, Fatdog's variants that runs on ARM machines, the raspi included. If I really want to, I could, in theory, build and package all these myself too, producing a custom FatdogArm build that does what retropie does. All the software used in retropie is FOSS software. The standard release of FatdogArm was built to run as a "desktop-replacement" OS, but of course at its very core it was designed to be modded to produce a build that met specific needs. Making a retro gaming machine would be one of those.

But of course, why bother? The folks who makes retropie does a very good job, and the result is a very polished retro gaming software. Unless you try very very hard, you won't even know that beneath all the pretty faces, it runs Raspian Buster Linux. Rather than spending thankless hours building software on FatdogArm so it can become retropie wannabe, I may as well use retropie as is and start gaming with my kids

Anyway. In case you want to try retropie and don't have raspi, there is no need to fret and there is no need to fork out extra dollars too. While originally designed for raspi (all varians from pi 0/1/2/3/4), today's retropie supports other platforms: Odroid C1/C2, Odroid XU3/XU4, as well as standard PC! Yes, standard PC. You can use your old laptop, old desktop, NUC if you have one, etc basically any PC. The details are all on their website, if you're interested, go ahead and check it out.

Meanwhile, I've got a few games I need to catch up.

Disclaimer: I am not affiliated with retropie or any of its developers. In fact I wasn't aware that it exists until last week. I'm writing this to share with fellow retro gamers who aren't aware of retropie.


Posted on 3 Sep 2020, 02:00 - Categories: Linux General
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